The myth of buffer time in projects – Part 2

Sabine Pfleger, Monday 05 August 2013 | Reading time: unknown

Part 2: Completing projects in time

Critical Chain - Project heat chart

Adapted from: www.Speed4Projects.Net

Author: Wolfram Müller, Speed4Projects; license agreement: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/de/legalcode

Last week’s post was about the phenomenon that even though there are generous buffer times, projects often are not completed in time. Most project teams are familiar with the procedure: After a relaxed initial phase, projects become very stressful for all team members. Actual times hardly ever stay below the estimated values.

But how can you avoid this problem?

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The myth of buffer time in projects - Part 1

Sabine Pfleger, Friday 26 July 2013 | Reading time: unknown

Part 1: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow…

The myth of buffer time in projects - InLoox

"Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion“, says Parkinson's law (C. Northcote Parkinson, 1955).

Everyone knows cases in which this doctrine applies to project management. At the beginning of a project, there is plenty of buffer time for all the project stages, so that the project team doesn’t fall behind and is able to deliver results to the customer in time. Towards the end of the project, things tend to get really stressful and meeting the project objectives is jeopardized. There are loads of projects which are finished far behind schedule.

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A new addition to the InLoox product family: The InLoox Mobile Apps

Sabine Pfleger, Wednesday 17 July 2013 | Reading time: unknown
   

Architects, corporate consultants or the field sales force are no longer the only ones to work on projects from changing locations. Mobility has become an important factor in all kinds of industries. Team members shuttle between projects and company sites and are part of distributed project teams.

While they are away on business, permanent callbacks at the office or the exchange of information via e-mail are cumbersome and error-prone. So, mobile team members often miss out on the change of a deadline or a contact person or on a new work package.

These are the team members we have developed our InLoox Mobile Apps for, which are now available for download.

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The Gantt Chart - Part 1

Sabine Pfleger, Friday 14 June 2013 | Reading time: unknown

You get more than 2.2 million results by entering “Gantt chart“ in Google. The bar chart that is widely used in project management has been pronounced dead ever so often, but still seems to be highly relevant.

Gantt Chart - InLoox

You get more than 2.2 million results by entering “Gantt chart“ in Google. The bar chart that is widely used in project management has been pronounced dead ever so often, but still seems to be highly relevant.

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Now available: InLoox PM Corporate Licenses

Sabine Pfleger, Friday 07 June 2013 | Reading time: unknown

InLoox PM Corporate License

For everyone who wants to equip large project teams or entire companies with InLoox PM, there is now a new type of license: The InLoox PM Corporate License. With this, you can provide all project team members in your company with InLoox PM.

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5 Questions on the Critical Path

Sabine Pfleger, Monday 27 May 2013 | Reading time: unknown

Kritischer Pfad

Source: http://projektmanagement-definitionen.de/glossar/kritischer-pfad/

The critical path is one of the classic instruments in project management and an excellent tool for project time planning. However, project management students and even experienced project managers often have difficulties explaining what the critical path really is. Our 5 questions on the critical path will help you to gain a better understanding:

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Check list: Project completion

Sabine Pfleger, Friday 17 May 2013 | Reading time: unknown

Check list project completion

The project is finally done and even the last work package is completed. After weeks of hard work, the team is looking forward to its well-deserved vacation or new tasks. Most of them are happy to leave the project behind after a stressful final project stage. No wonder that motivation for a formal project completion is low at that point. But if the customer demands improvements at a time when the team is already scattered to the four winds, a sloppy project completion will take its toll.

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